2012 Update: Social Media and Nonprofits

You’re going to want to tweet this: in response to May’s “Question of the Month,” 24% of respondents claimed that social media was the best marketing tool for nonprofits. “Word of mouth” and the organization’s own website tied for first place, each netting 29% of respondents’ votes.

http://onlinebusiness.volusion.com/articles/word-of-mouth-marketing-introduction/Not surprisingly, some nonprofits are turning to social media as a means to disseminate their missions, visions, and values. The Fourth Annual Nonprofit Social Network Benchmark Report reported that in 2012, 93% of U.S. nonprofit organizations have a presence on one or more social networking websites.

However, there are still many organizations that have no social media strategy to speak of. The answers to this month’s question reflect a number of trends we’ve noticed developing over the last few years:

  1. All nonprofits do not yet understand the power of social media.
  2. The priority placed on social media as a “connection tool” is sporadic and seems to  be used primarily by very large and very small nonprofits.
  3. Creativity relating to marketing remains very traditional. Even though everyone has a website and therefore the capability to connect with users via an interactive interface, many don’t.
  4. Impersonal marketing still dominates the landscape, and nonprofits suffer for it.

Over the last five years, many nonprofits have transitioned to using Facebook and Twitter as ways to build a donor base and market themselves to supporters. However, there is still a great deal to be learned about just how effective a tool Facebook and Twitter can be.

An astounding 98% of respondents to the Report indicated they have a presence on Facebook, offering many potential opportunities for fundraising. However, 53% of respondents said that they were NOT using Facebook for fundraising at all. 

Some organizations are opting for a modified social media fundraising approach. According to Robert Strickler, the Donor Pages Product Manager at DonorPerfect Software, an increasing amount of nonprofits are turning to what he calls a “donor driven” approach.

His firm has developed Donor Pages, an online “friend to friend portal” where an organization recruits its supporters to set up a website where they can reach out to family, friends, and colleagues and personally ask them to donate.

“Using a page like this gives ownership to the online social fundraising experience,” says Strickler. “We find that this tends to be effective because it operates on a more personal level.”

Just like fundraising through direct mail, meetings or phone calls, the same rules of stewardship are just as critical to online fundraising. Connection – genuine, heartfelt, and personal – is the key to fundraising success.

Adapted from “Social Media and Jewish Nonprofits: Missing in Action?” originally published on February 15, 2012 via eJewishPhilanthropy

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